Earth Day Environmental Awards

Congratulations to the recipients of the 2016 Georgia Tech Earth Day Environmental Awards!

   Students Organizing for Sustainability

   Carl DiSalvo


About the Awards:

The Earth Day Environmental Awards for Leadership and Sustainable Initiatives celebrate individuals or groups who are making a positive environmental impact, either through an exemplary new initiative or body of work. The awards recognize individuals or groups making positive environmental impacts, whether on campus, or in the community at large.

 

SOS

Students Organizing for Sustainability

Students Organizing for Sustainability (SOS) is a Georgia Tech student organization with a long history of helping the environment and initiating successful and sustainable projects at Georgia Tech. SOS's biggest ongoing project is the Campus Community Garden. The garden is a source of fresh produce from urban agriculture as well as a central point that fosters community interactions.

The garden brings together undergraduates, graduates, faculty, staff, and many organizations. Over just the past year, the garden has been utilized by outside groups such as International Education Week, which hosted a garden workday; Engineers for a Sustainable World, which tested organic herbicides in the garden; Greek life, which hosted recruitment workshops and service days in the garden; and Excel, which will use the garden as a living laboratory for a science class. The garden has also partnered with the GT Urban Honeybee Project to host pollinator workdays for the past two years where neonicotinoid-free flowers are planted throughout the garden.

 

Carl DiSalvo

Carl DiSalvo

Concrete Jungle forages fruits and nuts around the metro Atlanta area and donates them to local homeless shelters and food banks. In Concrete Jungle's seven years of existence, the organization has donated over ten tons of fresh, local produce that would have otherwise gone to waste. In spite of that, Concrete Jungle is only able to pick a small fraction of the 2600+ fruit trees in Atlanta. Many fruit trees have unpredictable crops and planning fruit-picking events around so many trees is a difficult logistics problem.

Dr. DiSalvo works with Concrete Jungle on the development of fruit tree-viewing drones, prototyping bend sensors for remote detection of fruit-laden tree branches, design studies of inconspicuous and protective packaging for securely storing electronic devices in trees, and the production of a fruit tree map and data management software system. Using Dr. DiSalvo's expertise about sensor deployments, and software developed by his research group, Concrete Jungle will be able to predict upcoming tree ripening events with much more clarity and will be able to forage even more fruit in the future.



Georgia Tech's Earth Day Festival
Friday, April 21, 2017
(10am - 3pm)